“President Mubarak’s continued leadership is crucial…. The president must stay in office to steer [the] changes.”
By Josetxo Ezcurra. 
h/t Tia Silvia

By Josetxo Ezcurra.
h/t Tia Silvia

[T]he recent Wikileaks revelations uncovered US foreknowledge of the regime’s brutality. Exposing what most informed political analysts, as well as the majority of Egyptians, have known all along about the Mubarak regime, the second highest recipient of US military and economic aid in the world after Israel, one cable pointed out that government brutality is ‘routine and pervasive’. Furthermore, the use of torture against ordinary criminals, Islamist detainees, opposition activists and bloggers, the cables acknowledged, is so widespread that the Egyptian government ‘no longer even tries to deny its existence.’

The cables also reveal that the Obama administration aimed to maintain a close political and military relationship with Mubarak, despite acknowledging the existence of a colossal democracy deficit, stating: ‘The tangible benefits to our [military] relationship are clear: Egypt remains at peace with Israel, and the US military enjoys priority access to the Suez canal and Egyptian airspace.’ […]

Once again, the Obama administration has demonstrated a gross duplicity in its approach to the issue of democracy promotion in the region. In this sense it, like other western governments expressing their preferences for ‘stability’ and ‘order’ over justice and accountability, has found itself on the wrong side of history.


Corinna Mullin: Obama and the Despots of the Middle East

Egypt receives close to $2bn in economic and military aid every year, making it the second largest recipient of US foreign assistance after Israel. Of that, $1.3bn is devoted to military assistance, according to the Congressional Research Service, the public policy arm of the US congress. … During the past four days of protests, it’s been widely reported that tear gas canisters fired at protesters are stamped “Made in USA”. … Among the weapons the US has provided Egypt: F-4 jet aircraft, F-16 jet fighters, armoured personnel carriers, Apache helicopters, antiaircraft missile batteries, and aerial surveillance aircraft, according to the US State Department. … Writing for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in 2009, Ahmad Al-Sayed El-Naggar said the money “does not aim to strengthen Egyptian military power against any external threat, as this would be contrary to the declared US objective of ensuring Israeli security and maintaining Israeli military supremacy over its Arab neighbors, including Egypt. Instead, this aid is devoted mainly to strengthening the regime’s domestic security and its ability to confront popular movements”.

Last December, a leaked US cable released by WikiLeaks revealed there is frustration on the part of Egyptian military officials who believe the $1.3bn a year in military aid is not enough. According to the cable, the deputy assistant secretary of defence for the Middle East, Dr. Colin Kahl, told them it was unlikely that the US would increase its aid given the “difficult financial times”. … He did, however, reassure the Egyptian officials that the US government would continue to advocate for current levels of military assistance, the cable states, “and push back on any attempts to condition those funds”.


- Laila Al-Arian for Al Jazeera via normanfinkelstein.com

“I really consider President and Mrs. Mubarak to be friends of my family.”
Hillary Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State under President Barack “Change” Obama
“Obama? The charismatic saint that wooed the globe is now being cursed on the streets of the Arab world as the ‘Black Bush’.”

JIM LEHRER: The word — the word to describe the leadership of Mubarak and Egypt and also in Tunisia before was dictator. Should Mubarak be seen as a dictator?

JOE BIDEN: Look, Mubarak has been an ally of ours in a number of things and he’s been very responsible on, relative to geopolitical interests in the region: Middle East peace efforts, the actions Egypt has taken relative to normalizing the relationship with Israel. And I think that it would be — I would not refer to him as a dictator.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Biden+Mubarak+dictator&aq=f

2009

Justin Webb (BBC): Do you regard President Mubarak as an authoritarian ruler?

President Obama: No, I tend not to use labels for folks. I haven’t met him. I’ve spoken to him on the phone. […] He has been a stalwart ally in many respects, to the United States. …I think he has been a force for stability. And good in the region.

“Our eventual goal is to create an equal society, not a society of privileges and class distinctions. Social justice is the first rule for peace and stability in society.”
– Hosni Mubarak, November 1981 (via teenagevictory)

(Source: american-decline)